Tag Archives: Alpharetta Real Estate Agent

Simple Updates to Bring Your 1970s Home into this Century

before-and-after-photos_005Whether you’re looking to move in the next few years or at some unknown point down the road, if you own an older home, it can be challenging to think about entering a housing market that is frequently flooded with new builds.  While there’s something to be said for the quality and integrity of older building materials, as well as the character that comes with etched woodwork and crown molding, if your home was built in the 60s or 70s, chances are good that it’s missing that old-time charm anyway.

What you will find, however, are things like wood paneling, dark flooring, dim lighting, and an abundance of popcorn ceilings.  In essence, things tend to feel a bit tight.  Therefore, if you’re looking to bring a home that’s 40 to 50-years-old into this century, a few tweaks can make a great deal of difference.

GET RID OF DARK PANELING

Homes in this era tend to have lower ceilings which, combined with darker wall coverings, often make people feel as if they’re living in a cave.  To really make things feel open and light, one of the first considerations should involve removing the dark paneling.  While this process definitely requires a bit of effort, it will be well worth it in the end.  If you’re extremely handy or have experience with this type of renovation, it’s certainly a project that can be done without professional help; however, depending upon the condition of your walls beneath the paneling, additional assistance may be required.

If you don’t have the time or money to remove the paneling all-together, consider painting over it with a light color.

BRING IN THE LIGHT

Since low ceilings tend to restrict the amount of light that comes into your home, a great remedy involves the installation of a few skylights.  While this is another project that you may be able to do on your own, it’s probably wise to hire the services of a professional.  Not only can they help make sure the installation is done right—you certainly don’t want rain leaking in—they can help you select the right type of skylights for your home, as well as your budget.

ADDING WINDOWS

Although replacing your existing windows may go a long way towards making your home feel a bit more modern, especially if they’ve become drafty over the years, part of allowing more light into your space may simply involve adding additional windows to certain rooms.

Clearly, this is generally a job for a professional, especially if you’re planning on adding windows or expanding existing ones.  Anytime you mess with your walls, it’s important to have a solid understanding of where your structural supports are, so making sure this project is done correctly is pretty important.

REPLACE YOUR FLOORING

Whether you’re dealing with carpeting, tile, or wood flooring, you’ll add more appeal to your home by replacing any dark flooring with lighter alternatives.  Consider swapping dark carpeting with lighter, more muted tones (e.g. beige, grey, off-white, etc.) and refinish any dark-stained wood with a lighter stain.  If you have an abundance of dated vinyl flooring, you may want to opt for a pale colored tile instead.

SAY GOODBYE TO THE POPCORN CEILINGS

Most homes built during the 60s and 70s have popcorn ceilings, which have a tendency to cause shadows and trap dust.  With that, no matter how well you renovate the rest of your home, they will always scream, “I was built in 1973!”  Therefore, updating your ceilings is wise investment and is something that doesn’t necessarily require the services of a professional painter.  Most people are entirely capable of doing it themselves; however, aside from being messy, it requires the use of certain tools that you simply may not have at home.

For tips on updating the curb appeal of your outdated home, stay tuned for next week’s blog.  As always, if you would like advice or want to know what types of home changes will give you the best bang for your buck, please contact me.  I’m always here to help.

Marie Dinsmore | The Dinsmore Team | www.DinsmoreTeam.com | 770-712-7789

So, What Exactly is the Fair Housing Act?

My-interracial-nuclear-familyWhen it comes to real estate and most forms of housing, the Fair Housing Act creates a blanket of sorts that envelops those looking to purchase or rent a residence.  In essence, while there are still stipulations, race, color, national origin, religion, sex, familial status, or disability cannot be a deciding factor in things such as refusing to rent or sell housing, set different terms or conditions, or deny a dwelling.

Dating back to the 1960’s, the large political movements pushing to outlaw discrimination also set their sights on a broad range of housing transactions—to include mortgage lending, advertising, zoning, and homeowner’s insurance.  Termed fair or open housing, President Lyndon B. Johnson urged congress to finally pass the federal Fair Housing Act, which sought to create a cohesive housing market in which a person’s look, culture, or background would not limit their access to property.

WHAT IS PROHIBITED?

In the sale and rental of housing, no one may take any of the following actions based on race, color, national origin, religion, sex, familial status, or disability:

  • Refuse to rent or sell housing
  • Refuse to negotiate for housing
  • Make housing unavailable
  • Deny a dwelling
  • Set different terms, conditions, or privileges for sale or rental of a dwelling
  • Provide different housing services or facilities
  • Falsely deny that housing is available for inspection, sale, or rental
  • For profit, persuade owners to sell or rent (blockbusting)
  • Deny anyone access to or membership in a facility or service (such as a multiple
  • listing service) related to the sale or rental of housing

In mortgage lending, no one may take any of the following actions on the basis of:

  • race, color, national origin, religion, sex, familial status, or disability
  • Refuse to make a mortgage loan;
  • Refuse to provide information regarding loans;
  • Impose different terms or conditions on a loan, such as different interest rates, points, or fees;
  • Discriminate in appraising property;
  • Refuse to purchase a loan; or
  • Set different terms or conditions for purchasing a loan

Individuals who feel that they have been discriminated against in the housing process can lodge a complaint with HUD’s Office of Fair Housing & Equal Opportunity (FHEO), where the issue in question will be forwarded to the state; however, it’s important to note that local agencies will be investigating the case instead of FHEO.

If you have any questions, I would love to be of service.  Please do not hesitate to contact me for assistance.

Marie Dinsmore | The Dinsmore Team | www.dinsmoreteam.com | 770-712-7789

Community Resources

WELCOME

2019 Welcome Services

The Dinsmore Team has created this handy guide for both Buyers and Sellers. The guide lists trusted service providers that we use personally and professionally. The providers listed service the Forsyth and North Fulton County areas.

2014 Complete Guide to Moving

This 20-Page Guide will be your comprehensive source for selling your home and planning your move. It includes tips for getting ready to sell, planning your move, packing and transitioning into your new home.

2014 Home Owners Tip Guide

This 20-Page Guide will help you develop an annual maintenance schedule for your home's systems and appliances to help you avoid bigger problems by taking care of them while they are small. It's also a great resource for trouble shooting malfunctions on your own, saving you time and money.


utilities

Looking for a fast way to connect all of your utility services online? Try Connect Utilities.

Please let us know if there are other resources you'd like to see.

Marie@DinsmoreTeam.com

770-712-7789